What, how, and why of the sex muscle answered

  • By Team TDO
What the Penis is made up of? The penis is made up of several parts.
  1. The head: This is also called as the ‘glans’. The glans is coated with soft pinkish tissue called the mucosa. The protective covering of the glans is called the foreskin. The foreskin is retractable. In circumcised men, it is the foreskin that is removed.
  2. The shaft: The shaft or the body of the penis has two surfaces. The dorsal part i.e. the upper part of an erect penis and the ventral part i.e. the lower part that faces backwards in a flaccid penis.
  3. The root: This is the attached part of the penis.
  4. Corpus cavernosum: This is the tissue that lines the shaft on two sides on the dorsal side. During sexual excitement, this corpus cavernosum fills with blood that results in the stiff erect penis.
  5. Corpus spongiosum: This is the tissue layer running in between the two layers of corpus cavernosum on the ventral side of the shaft.
  6. The urethra: This is a narrow tube that runs through the corpus spongiosum. The urethra’s main function is to excrete the urine out of the body.
How the Penis does what it is supposed to do? Urination: The process of expelling urine is a coordinated act involving the bladder muscles, the central and the somatic nervous systems. The urethra present in the penis serves as a tube for the urine to pass out. Erection: A erect penis is required for the successful insertion into the vagina. During the height of sexual excitement, there occurs dilatation or enlargement of the blood vessels in the corpus cavernosum causing a rush of blood into it. This elongates the penis and makes it hard and stiff. Erection angles: The way a normal penis points when erect is called the erection angle. The penis is either pointing straight to the front or it may be facing up or down to the feet. An upward angle is most common. A study published in ‘Journal of Sex and Marital Therapy’, shows the erectile angles in standing males from 20 to 69 age groups in the following table In the table, zero degrees is pointing straight up against the abdomen, 90 degrees is horizontal and pointing straight forward, while 180 degrees would be pointing straight down to the feet. Angles from vertically upwards:
  1. 0-3 - 5% of male
  2. 30-60 - 30% of males
  3. 60-85 - 31% of males
  4. 85-95 - 10% of males
  5. 95-125 - 20% of males
  6. 120-180 - 5% of males
Ejaculation: Ejaculation is when the semen is pushed out of the penis. During the sexual act, the process of ejaculation forms the culmination with the male achieving an orgasm immediately after. At times, there is ejaculation of semen spontaneously during sleep, called Wet Dreams. Normal Variations- When you have what others don’t (and it is completely normal to have them)!
  1. Curvatures: While most penises are straight, it is not abnormal to have a curved penis. Curvatures up to 30 degrees are considered normal and no medical attention is advised. Over 45 degrees may need you to get yourself checked for certain diseases, though.
  2. Phimosis: This is the inability to retract the fore-skin fully. It is harmless and occurs in about 8% of boys. The British Medical Association suggests that no medical treatment may be required till 19years of age.
  3. Pearly Penile Papules: These are small pale bumps that are found around the tip of the penis. They are very common in men aged 20 to 40 years and may be mistaken for warts. Unlike warts though, they are completely harmless and require no treatment.
The human penis has one of the most advanced designs through eons of natural selection for high sperm competition. Disorders of the Penis: When you have what others don’t (and it is not normal to have them)!
  1. Paraphimosis: This is the inability to retract the foreskin. It may be extremely painful when retracted. This condition occurs when there is leftover fluid accumulated n the foreskin due to some previous surgery.
  2. Peyronie’s Disease: This is a condition where the penis is extremely curved. It is caused due to a scar tissue running through the shaft of the penis. There is an option of surgical correction.
  3. Herpetic Eruptions: This can happen when there is unprotected intercourse with an infected partner. It shows as painful ulcers and eruptions on the head and shaft of the penis.
  4. Absence of sensations and erection: This is a condition where one is not able to feel any kind of sensation in the penis and a total lack of erection. This occurs secondary to diabetes mellitus and also as an after-effect of past falls on the back or injuries to the groin area.
  5. Erectile Dysfunction: This is a condition that happens due to psychological stress, performance anxiety, natural ageing and diabetes mellitus. It is expressed as an inability to get aroused or inability to maintain the erection for a time enough for proper sexual activity.
  6. Priapism: This is a serious condition requiring immediate medical attention. Here the erect penis fails to return to its flaccid state and as a result may lead to potentially serious conditions like a thrombosis or gangrenous state. Severe cases may require amputation too. The causative mechanisms are not well-known but involve complex neurological and vascular factors. The condition is associated with drugs like sildenafil, commonly known as Viagra.
  7. Pudendal Nerve Entrapment: Too tight pants and underwear, arrow hard bicycle seats, accidents can lead to this condition. The symptoms include loss of sensation and ability to achieve orgasm along with pain in the penis during sitting.
  8. Infections: Common infections of the penis include balanitis, urethritis, syphilis and gonorrhea. Theya re characterized by burning, itching and foul discharge.
Lasting longer in bed is every man’s desire. How do you go about it is very important. Follow the right diet and exercises along with lifestyle changes to achieve the desired effect in bed. Stay away from medications that claim to make you last long. Ref: Sparling J (1997). "Penile erections: shape, angle, and length". Journal of Sex & Marital Therapy 23 (3): 195–207

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